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Atlanta Wide Awakes
Address: 112 SW Arch Street  Show Map  Get Directions
City: Atlanta, IL
Phone: 217-732-8687
This Looking For Lincoln wayside tells the story of the Atlanta Wide Awakes, a chapter of the "Wide Awakes" group formed on June 22nd, 1860, in Atlanta, Illinois. The "Wide Awakes" was political group established to support Abraham Lincoln. This group was primarily made up of young, unmarried men, marched through the streets of downtown Atlanta in support of their candidate in solemn, torch-lit spectacles. On August 8th, 1860, the Atlanta Wide Awakes joined a crowd of 80,000 people at the state capital to celebrate Lincoln's presidential nomination. At 10:00 A.M. that morning, a massive parade began with citizens from Atlanta in attendance carrying a banner depicting Abraham Lincoln as the "railsplitter" and his running mate, Hannibal Hamblin. Groups like the Wide Awakes served as poll watchers, to defend against purported attempts of ballot tampering by their political opponents. Other times they often gathered to sing political songs and rally the party faithful to the polls.
Captain Adam Bogardus Gravesite
Address: County Road 10 - Elkhart Cemetery  Show Map  Get Directions
City: Elkhart, IL
Captain Adam Bogardus was a famous sharpshooter in the late 1800s and held the title of World’s Wingshot Championship for 17 years. Bogardus won the championship of America in 1871 and went to England in 1875. There he met all comers, successfully defending the championship until 1878, when he returned to America. Bogardus was the only person who ever killed 100 live birds with 100 consecutive shots. The feat was accomplished in July, 1869, at Dexter Park, Chicago. In 1872 at Madison Square Garden, New York, he broke 5500 glass balls in 7 hrs. 19 mins. 7 secs. In 1883 and 1884, Capt. Bogardus was a one-third owner in the Buffalo Bill Wild West show. It was at this time that the Bogardus family, father and four sons, gained a worldwide reputation as sharpshooters. Borgardus was 80 years old when he passed away on March 23, 1913 at his home in Lincoln, Illinois.

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Governor Richard Oglesby's Mausoleum
Address: County Road 10 - Elkhart Cemetery  Show Map  Get Directions
City: Elkhart, IL
Phone: 217-947-2046
Governor Richard J. Oglesby (1824-1899), was Governor of Illinois and was also intimate personal friend of Abraham Lincoln. His Mausoleum sits on Elkhart Hill along with other famous figures laid to rest in Elkhart Cemetery.

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Langston Hughes' First Poem Marker
Address: 101 8th Street  Show Map  Get Directions
City: Lincoln, IL
Phone: 217-732-8687
This internationally known African-American author (1902 - 1967) acknowledges in his autobiography "The Big Sea" that he wrote his first poem while attending Central School here in Lincoln. Ethel Welch, his eighth grade teacher, asked him to write the graduation poem. With no prior experience, Hughes prepared an eight-verse piece to honor each of the school's eight instructors, and the poem was printed in the commencement program. Her graduated in 1916 with a class of eighty students. Hughes, a native of Joplin, Missouri, who had grown up in Lawrence, Kansas, had come to Lincoln in 1915 to live with his mother and step-father. He attended High School in Cleveland, Ohio.
Samuel Parks' Office Site
Address: 115 S. Kickapoo Street  Show Map  Get Directions
City: Lincoln, IL
Phone: 217-732-2929
At this site was located the law office of Samuel C. Parks, a friend of Abraham Lincoln. Born in Vermont in 1820, Parks eventually moved to Logan County, where he served with Lincoln on the Eighth Judicial Circuit. The two men shared law offices in Mt. Pulaski and Lincoln. Both men were jointly associated with several legal cases. Aside from his legal duties, Parks was elected to the Illinois Legislature in 1854.
The Niebuhr Family of Theologians Marker
Address: Maple & 7th Street  Get Directions
City: Lincoln, IL
Phone: 217-732-8687
The Niebuhr family, called "the Trapp family of theology" by Time Magazine, produced four distinguished professors of Christian studies. This marker at St. John's United Church of Christ describes the contributions of the Niebuhr family to religious education and the community.

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William Maxwell Boyhood Home
Address: 184 9th Street  Show Map  Get Directions
City: Lincoln, IL
Phone: 217-732-8687
William Maxwell (1908-2000), author and editor, lived at this home from 1910 to 1920. Maxwell often returned to the home and Lincoln, Illinois, in his novels and short stories. His Midwestern childhood, particularly the loss of his mother in the Spanish influenza epidemic of 1918, influenced much of his writing. Maxwell graduated from the University of Illinois and then served as fiction editor for The New Yorker from 1936 to 1976. He authored fourteen works of fiction and memoir, with the novel So Long, See You Tomorrow, earning the American Book Award in 1980. His name is etched on the frieze of the Illinois State Library.

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Attractions, Historical Figures